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Monday is the best day to apply for a job
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 06, 2013 18:51 PM

Unfortunately for job seekers, the best day of the week to apply for a position is typically not included among the results of an aptitude test. Fortunately, Bright.com, a website designed to match recruiters with those who are looking for work, recently determined that the answer to this question is Monday, according to ABC News.

The news source highlighted the findings of a Bright.com study, which showed that 30 percent of job seekers who submitted their application on a Monday continued on to the hiring process' next stage. Only 20 percent of those who applied on Tuesdays were able to accomplish the same, while 14 percent of individuals who applied on Saturdays advanced.

With the holiday season about to begin, some individuals may not think the day of the week matters all that much in their job search. After all, many people believe that companies are more concerned with taking time off during late November and December than looking for new hires.

"Don't assume everyone has closed up shop for the holidays," Bob Corlett, founder and president of Staffing Advisors, wrote in a guest column in the Baltimore Business Journal. "Lots of employers are actively interviewing right now, and most are hoping you can start work in December or early January."

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Career Test Information

Monday is the best day to apply for a job
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 06, 2013 18:51 PM

Unfortunately for job seekers, the best day of the week to apply for a position is typically not included among the results of an aptitude test. Fortunately, Bright.com, a website designed to match recruiters with those who are looking for work, recently determined that the answer to this question is Monday, according to ABC News.

The news source highlighted the findings of a Bright.com study, which showed that 30 percent of job seekers who submitted their application on a Monday continued on to the hiring process' next stage. Only 20 percent of those who applied on Tuesdays were able to accomplish the same, while 14 percent of individuals who applied on Saturdays advanced.

With the holiday season about to begin, some individuals may not think the day of the week matters all that much in their job search. After all, many people believe that companies are more concerned with taking time off during late November and December than looking for new hires.

"Don't assume everyone has closed up shop for the holidays," Bob Corlett, founder and president of Staffing Advisors, wrote in a guest column in the Baltimore Business Journal. "Lots of employers are actively interviewing right now, and most are hoping you can start work in December or early January."

... READ MORE
Report highlights disconnect between job seekers and hiring managers
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2013 15:01 PM

After taking an aptitude test, job seekers may have a good sense of what skills they possess. However, these individuals need to be careful not to become overconfident in terms of what they have to offer. Based on the findings contained in a recent Career Advisory Board report, companies may not be as confident in job candidates' abilities.

Differences of opinion
The new report, which was created using survey responses from 507 job seekers and 500 hiring managers, shows that members of these two groups are out of sync. For example, 56 percent of job seekers said they are confident they know what companies are looking for in potential employees, while 72 percent of them are confident in their ability to share their skills and experience with employers.

However, hiring managers are not as confident in job seekers' abilities, and only 15 percent of these company officials said job seekers have the skills they desire. This disconnect is problematic, as people's overconfidence could be standing between them and the positions they desire.

Growing pessimism
The disconnect between job seekers and hiring managers could also affect individuals' outlook on the nation's economy. Although the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics states that the unemployment rate currently sits at 7.2 percent - the lowest it has been since 2008 - many people seeking employment are becoming pessimistic.

According to the report, 37 percent of job seekers said they have no confidence in the job market's ability to improve next year. This figure is a 7 percent increase over last year's total.

"We're seeing an increasing number of job seekers who are losing hope, but the economy isn't fully to blame," said Alexandra Levit, business and workplace consultant and Career Advisory Board member, in a statement. "Opportunities do exist for job seekers who are able to effectively demonstrate to hiring managers that they have specific in-demand skills."

Economic confidence high among hiring managers
While many job seekers are pessimistic, hiring managers are more hopeful. The report reveals that 86 percent of these professionals are somewhat confident the job market will improve next year.

In fact, 67 percent of hiring managers are so confident in the economy that they do not feel as though they need to settle for job candidates who are not perfect for open positions.

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Students don't have to attend top colleges to get a job
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013 07:35 AM

As graduation approaches, college students may take an aptitude test to gain a better sense of what type of career is right for them. However, individuals who do not attend one of the nation's top schools may think they face an uphill battle in an already very competitive job market.

If students believe employers will hold their college's reputation against them, they may be worrying for nothing. According to CBS MoneyWatch, officials at many companies understand that not everybody has the opportunity to attend a top institution. Not having a degree from a big-name college is OK.

"It's better to hire a graduate from a B-level college who had an exceptional academic record, as compared to hiring a graduate from an A-level college who had a mediocre or poor academic record," Ford Myers, author of "Get The Job You Want, Even When No One's Hiring," told the news source.

New college graduates may be in luck when it comes to their job search, as the National Association of Colleges and Employers recently announced that employers plan to hire 7.8 percent more new degree holders during the 2013-2014 academic year than they did last year.

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Career-minded college students can attend job fairs
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 09, 2013 10:33 AM

Taking an aptitude test and attending networking events are just two ways job seekers can increase their chances of finding work. However, as college students near the end of their studies, they may wonder if there is anything they should be doing differently than the average job seeker.

Recently, CBS MoneyWatch highlighted a few steps students can take to help them land a job before graduation, such as updating their social media profiles, connecting with potential employers online and becoming more organized. What the news source did not mention was attending job fairs.

Every year, colleges and universities invite companies to campus so that students can get to know potential employers. If degree seekers want to land a position before they graduate, they should find a job fair close to them.

For example, Loyola University Maryland will host its Fall Career Fair 2013 Oct. 30, while Bunker Hill Community College in Boston will host the Fall 2013 Job Fair Nov. 20. Several other job fairs will be held nationwide, so collegiate job seekers should see what types of events are coming to their campus.

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View Facebook through the eyes of potential employers
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 17, 2013 10:46 AM

While it is fine for job seekers to have a Facebook profile, they need to be careful about what they share on their personal wall. More people than their friends may be looking at their status updates, pictures and videos.

Fortunately, it is very easy for Facebook users to find out what people outside of their social network can see. All job seekers need to do is click the cog-shaped icon in the top right corner of the screen and select "Privacy Settings." On the left side of the page, Facebook users should click "Timeline and Tagging" and turn their attention to the "Who can see things on my timeline?" category. The "Review what other people see on your timeline" feature allows them to see what people on the Web would see if they visited the page of someone they are not friends with.

This process gives job seekers a chance to see how much their Facebook page could hurt their employment prospects. This is becoming more important with each passing day, as Jobvite recently revealed that many recruiters visit Facebook to learn about prospective employees, Mashable reported.

With their Facebook page no longer a hindrance, job seekers can dedicate their time to taking an aptitude test, networking and anything else that will help them land their dream gig.

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What to do when former employers give bad references
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2013 09:20 AM

The results of an aptitude test can provide job seekers with a sense of what type of employee they will be, but not the kind of boss they will have. This is unfortunate, as not every manager people have will be a shining example of true leadership. In some cases, the bosses workers have can take actions that will sabotage their chances of achieving career success, such as giving a bad reference to potential employers.

While the negativity shared in a bad reference can hurt job seekers' chances of landing a good position, there are ways to move past a former manager's grudge and focus on what really matters. Here are a few tips that may prove helpful:

Get help from a lawyer
Searching for jobs is stressful enough as is, which is why people may hesitate to make the process even more complicated by bringing in a lawyer. However, if a former boss keeps saying horrible things, seeking legal action may be the only option.

Lawyers can send a cease-and-desist letter to employers who seem to have nothing but bad things to say, according to the Houston Chronicle. Taking this action could be enough to get the reference in question to ratchet down their attacks and focus on the basics. Unfortunately, further legal work is sometimes required. Ultimately, it's important for job seekers to remember that this process can be expensive, which can become troublesome if they are unemployed and money is dwindling.

Talk through it
If job seekers are good with words, Scripps Howard News Service suggests they try and preempt a bad reference. If candidates have a good idea of what their previous employer will say about them, they can explain the challenges they faced in their own words. However, the news source warns that job seekers' words could seem like complaints if they are not careful.

Be honest
Sometimes, just being honest is the best approach. If job seekers are informed of the details of a negative reference during an interview, they can address them and then make the conversation more positive. Individuals can say that they and a former boss did not get along, but not dwell on it. The interview should focus on what they have to offer a company and not the past.

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How to impress a bored interviewer
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 04, 2013 09:58 AM

No matter how interesting job seekers think they are, or what kinds of skills an aptitude test says they possess, they may sit for an interview with someone who is less than impressed with what they have to say. If candidates suspect that their interviewer is growing bored with their responses, they should do what they can to turn things around.

If job candidates are looking for quick and easy ways of improving their interview, they should follow CBS MoneyWatch's advice and assume an upright and attentive position. In addition, individuals can stop themselves from using too much jargon. Nothing brings someone out of a conversation faster than technical terms they are unfamiliar with.

Perhaps an interviewer's boredom stems from too many lengthy responses to simple questions. If candidates feel this is the case, the news source suggests they strive to shorten their replies.

"Rather than giving all the aspects of a story, consider limiting yourself to just the important facts - that is, the things that are essential to understand what you did and why it mattered," Gayle Laakmann McDowell, author and career expert, tells Business Insider.

McDowell also recommends individuals vary their volume and tone as a way of regaining their interviewer's attention.

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Tips for finding work overseas
TUESDAY, AUGUST 27, 2013 09:50 AM

While the U.S. economy shows definite signs of improvement, that doesn't mean job seekers are guaranteed positions. Those who have grown frustrated with their employment search may decide it's time to look for work overseas. If they choose to do so, there are a few things they need to know.

For starters, not only do job seekers need to have a strong sense of what they want, but who they are and what skills they possess. If they have yet to do so, they should consider taking an aptitude test, as it can reveal a lot about what they have to offer employers.

After job seekers are finished learning about themselves, they need to research the country they wish to work in. Forbes suggests individuals find out about the cultural, economic and political conditions in a nation, as well as its level of stability. Any one of these factors could affect their likelihood of landing a position.

At the same time, U.S. News & World Report recommends job seekers who have experience or contacts abroad tap into their network. Whether individuals studied abroad in college or have relatives living overseas, any contacts could provide job leads.

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Small businesses demand more skilled workers
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 21, 2013 10:04 AM

Job seekers may have a good idea of what their strengths and weaknesses are, but the results of a career aptitude test can provide an additional level of confirmation. With this information, individuals can search for employment opportunities with a better sense of their abilities and skills.

This knowledge can be important - especially among those who want to work for small businesses. The recently released results of a Robert Half survey reveal that 60 percent of more than 300 small business owners and managers believe finding skilled workers is their greatest challenge in terms of hiring and managing employees.

Paul McDonald, the senior executive director with Robert Half, told Fox Business that a current talent shortage is driving competition in the job market. Small businesses are not only competing with one another, but larger companies as well.

"Large corporations often have established brand recognition and larger human resources budgets, which can provide an advantage when attracting talent," said McDonald, in a statement. "But small businesses may appeal to professionals who want to acquire a variety of experiences and move up quickly."

With this knowledge, job seekers could develop their skills and possibly become the types of candidates small businesses are in desperate need of.

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2-page resumes are OK
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2013 10:15 AM

When individuals visit any number of the employment websites on the Internet, they are likely to come across a list of things they should be doing to land a job. While some tips, like taking an aptitude test, can be helpful, others could derail potential career success.

For example, resume length is an issue that often trips up job seekers. Some individuals put too much information on their resumes, while others add too little. Forbes advises people who keep their resume confined to a single page to forget what they have been told.

According to the news source, job seekers who have been working for three to five years should not hesitate to spread their resume out over two pages. At the same time, individuals should not strive for two pages if they do not have enough credentials. It is better to have a one-page resume than two pages of extraneous or fabricated information.

As for the three-page resume - Paul C. Green, an author and former hiring manager, told Monster that going beyond two pages is "too much." After all, hiring managers want to sit down and learn about a potential employee and not read a book.

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