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How to increase your IQ over time
MONDAY, JANUARY 16, 2017 00:00 AM

An individual's IQ is not set in stone. In fact, you can take steps to improve your IQ over time with some learning opportunities and activities. If you want to increase your IQ, here are some ways to do so:

Try new things

The phrase, "You can't teach an old dog new tricks" is entirely false. In fact, acquiring new knowledge and skills is a crucial step towards upping your overall IQ. One way to do this is to take on a language you have never tried before. Start by studying vocabulary words and learning beginning phrases like, "Where is the bathroom?" and "My name is ____." You could even learn a language with your family! It is a great way for kids to improve their IQs as well as work on English skills.

Gaining a new physical skill can also bump up your IQ. While you may not think beginning to play soccer, for example, can help your smarts, the game is not just about running and kicking. Sports teach physical skills but also improve critical thinking, logical reasoning and cooperation.
Playing an instrument can also prove useful. Even if you have never looked at a music note in your life, beginning to learn now may help you improve cognitive thinking and memory. Try a woodwind instrument like the flute or saxophone, or go for a stringed one such as the guitar or ukulele. Musical knowledge and skills only improve through practice, so don't learn one chord and expect your IQ to rise. Instead, dedicate a period of time each day to learn new chords and notes and practice songs.

Read

A study at Emory University noted that reading novels can improve overall brain function and connectivity. Reading fiction can help people mentally put themselves in the place of the protagonist as the character navigates his world. The very act of understanding the English language as you read also improves IQ, especially if you read books that include words you do not yet know. That does not mean you should go out and try to read the dictionary or an encyclopedia from cover to cover. Instead, read books at your reading level, and slowly work your way up to more difficult books. Use context clues in the sentence around words you do not know to guess what they mean. Then, compare your thoughts with the actual definition. This is a great way to learn - you will be more likely to remember new words if you have first guessed their meaning as you will recall how right or totally wrong you were.

Be creative

Taking time to be creative can benefit people as artistic endeavors are connected to the more logical thinking left side of the brain. An article in Scientific American noted that creative thinking tends to involve switching from conventional and unconventional thought, or one side of the brain to the other. Let's say that you decide to use child's building toys to create a castle, for example. You are paying attention to the color schemes to keep your architecture looking uniform while also making some areas, like turrets and the mote, stand out. This is artistic. You are also using math to ensure the sides are symmetrical as you select pieces and connectors. You are gaining problem-solving skills as well as learning how to innovate, both crucial parts of higher IQs.

Get moving

Try this little experiment: Take an online IQ test at home. Write down your score. Then, partake in some high-intensity exercise like running, rowing or playing a game of soccer. Immediately after, take another IQ test. You may be surprised to learn that you earn a better score after exercising. Many studies state that post-workout brains are flooded with hormones that can improve memory and cognitive functioning. The hormones are potentially beneficial for the hippocampus, the part of the brain that controls memory and learning. Regular exercise can improve neuron growth, reducing stress, depression and anxiety which can all negatively impact your IQ and test-taking practices.

Try practice tests

Professor Alan S. Kaufman told Men's Health magazine that taking practice IQ tests can raise your score by up to two full points. Why does this help? Tests are often not just about the subject matter found in the questions. Instead, the actual act of taking the exam is also assessed. Taking practice versions of IQ tests can better prepare you for future tries as you will know what to expect and prepare for.

Also be sure that you have eaten a high-fiber meal within an hour or two of taking an IQ test. This will provide energy so you are at the top of your game and ready to show your real IQ.... READ MORE

IQ Test Information


How to increase your IQ over time
MONDAY, JANUARY 16, 2017 00:00 AM

An individual's IQ is not set in stone. In fact, you can take steps to improve your IQ over time with some learning opportunities and activities. If you want to increase your IQ, here are some ways to do so:

Try new things

The phrase, "You can't teach an old dog new tricks" is entirely false. In fact, acquiring new knowledge and skills is a crucial step towards upping your overall IQ. One way to do this is to take on a language you have never tried before. Start by studying vocabulary words and learning beginning phrases like, "Where is the bathroom?" and "My name is ____." You could even learn a language with your family! It is a great way for kids to improve their IQs as well as work on English skills.

Gaining a new physical skill can also bump up your IQ. While you may not think beginning to play soccer, for example, can help your smarts, the game is not just about running and kicking. Sports teach physical skills but also improve critical thinking, logical reasoning and cooperation.
Playing an instrument can also prove useful. Even if you have never looked at a music note in your life, beginning to learn now may help you improve cognitive thinking and memory. Try a woodwind instrument like the flute or saxophone, or go for a stringed one such as the guitar or ukulele. Musical knowledge and skills only improve through practice, so don't learn one chord and expect your IQ to rise. Instead, dedicate a period of time each day to learn new chords and notes and practice songs.

Read

A study at Emory University noted that reading novels can improve overall brain function and connectivity. Reading fiction can help people mentally put themselves in the place of the protagonist as the character navigates his world. The very act of understanding the English language as you read also improves IQ, especially if you read books that include words you do not yet know. That does not mean you should go out and try to read the dictionary or an encyclopedia from cover to cover. Instead, read books at your reading level, and slowly work your way up to more difficult books. Use context clues in the sentence around words you do not know to guess what they mean. Then, compare your thoughts with the actual definition. This is a great way to learn - you will be more likely to remember new words if you have first guessed their meaning as you will recall how right or totally wrong you were.

Be creative

Taking time to be creative can benefit people as artistic endeavors are connected to the more logical thinking left side of the brain. An article in Scientific American noted that creative thinking tends to involve switching from conventional and unconventional thought, or one side of the brain to the other. Let's say that you decide to use child's building toys to create a castle, for example. You are paying attention to the color schemes to keep your architecture looking uniform while also making some areas, like turrets and the mote, stand out. This is artistic. You are also using math to ensure the sides are symmetrical as you select pieces and connectors. You are gaining problem-solving skills as well as learning how to innovate, both crucial parts of higher IQs.

Get moving

Try this little experiment: Take an online IQ test at home. Write down your score. Then, partake in some high-intensity exercise like running, rowing or playing a game of soccer. Immediately after, take another IQ test. You may be surprised to learn that you earn a better score after exercising. Many studies state that post-workout brains are flooded with hormones that can improve memory and cognitive functioning. The hormones are potentially beneficial for the hippocampus, the part of the brain that controls memory and learning. Regular exercise can improve neuron growth, reducing stress, depression and anxiety which can all negatively impact your IQ and test-taking practices.

Try practice tests

Professor Alan S. Kaufman told Men's Health magazine that taking practice IQ tests can raise your score by up to two full points. Why does this help? Tests are often not just about the subject matter found in the questions. Instead, the actual act of taking the exam is also assessed. Taking practice versions of IQ tests can better prepare you for future tries as you will know what to expect and prepare for.

Also be sure that you have eaten a high-fiber meal within an hour or two of taking an IQ test. This will provide energy so you are at the top of your game and ready to show your real IQ.
... READ MORE
Why that social media IQ test is inaccurate
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 2014 10:41 AM

Many people are curious what their IQ scores are, so when a five-minute IQ test circulated on social media, it was no surprise that it spread quickly. These short-and-sweet quizzes seem to pop up every now and then, giving Facebook users the chance to see how smart they are. The only problem is that these quick tests are inaccurate.

IQ scoring
The most recent social media phenomenon awarded an IQ score after the test taker completed a series of 18 questions. People could then post their scores to social media, sharing their perceived intelligence with their friends. However, according to The Mary Sue, the majority of people who took the quiz scored in the 125-134 range. If you know anything about how real IQ tests are scored, you know the majority of people get around 100.

IQ testing is a form of norm-reference test. In essence, the scores are compared to a median score that most people earn. The average intelligence falls around 100. People who are smarter or less smart than average score outside of the normal range. Outlier scores are comparable to a percentage. For instance, a person who scored 124 is estimated to be as intelligent as 6 percent of people.

The quiz alludes to the comparison structure of IQ scores. The quiz tells users how their score compares to the rest of the population. However, it still awards a few too many surprising results.

Testing time
Standard IQ tests, including the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scales and the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS-IV), take a decent amount of time to complete: anywhere from an hour to 90 minutes. Children's IQ tests may not take quite as long (about 40-60 minutes). Each contain a long list of questions that test a person's cognitive abilities based on things like memory. Completing only a few questions won't provide strong enough evidence for how intelligent the test taker is.

While taking a short quiz to fill up a few minutes can be fun, you shouldn't use the assessments as the end all be all. You'll only get an accurate reading of your IQ score by taking exams that are certified by a qualified psychologist. 

Improving your IQ
The quiz was spread on Facebook as an advertising tool. The company says it can help people improve their IQ. While the quiz provides an inaccurate IQ score, the idea that people can improve their intelligence is actually correct. IQ is fluid, and can be exercised. Children are able to improve their IQ the most, as their minds are still developing and learning. Adults can too, just not to such a great degree. 

... READ MORE
Genetic IQ tests to begin in China
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2014 13:51 PM

While some parents might wonder if their child will have a certain eye color, how tall the baby will grow up to be or if the newborn will have any life-threatening illnesses, other parents have jumped right to considering how high their baby can score on IQ tests. In order to meet this small but growing demand, a Chinese company called BGI has been developing a way to predict intelligence levels while the child is still in the embryonic stage.

Mapping the intelligence genomes
BGI has a number of researchers working in its cognitive genomics department seeking answers to questions such as why children can have higher IQ scores than their parents. BGI owns 178 sequencing machines and produces approximately 25 percent of the world's genomic data. The researchers have genetic material from a number of volunteers. The participants in BGI's genomic project are mainly individuals who have a high aptitude in mathematics or physics, Ph.D holders, and people who have near-perfect SAT or GRE scores. By pouring all this data into their sequencing machines, the scientists hope to find the key to genius-level intelligence.

The BGI scientists' theory revolves around the mapping of genius' genomes. Once the scientists complete the map, they aim to identify which of the genes influence intelligence. Researchers have used similar methods to isolate the genes that cause black hair or right-handedness.

Controversy and consequences of BGI research
The ethical ramifications of BGI's research are significant. Parents could potentially fertilize multiple embryos and select one that has the greatest potential for intelligence. Some Westerners shudder at the thought, but some citizens in Asia don't find BGI's work unsettling at all. According to Bowen Zhao, the head of the BGI cognitive genomics department, many Chinese people welcome the research. If BGI's project goes on as planned, people will have a chance to break cultural barriers and become successful through education and intelligence. 

Government support of cognitive genomics in China
The Chinese government demonstrated interest in BGI's project by giving the company $1.5 billion to fund further research. The act comes as a surprise given the Chinese's previous hesitance to share information and the company's future plans for the project. BGI previously stated that it will make all its data available to the public. The company did something similar when a strain of E. coli hit Germany in 2011, sequencing the strain in three days and tweeting details and information about the bacteria throughout the process.

... READ MORE
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Kids IQ Test Information


Is your IQ really 50% nature and 50% nurture?
TUESDAY, JANUARY 03, 2017 00:00 AM

When children are born, do they already have a certain limited intelligence that they can reach because of genetics? Are only those with genius parents going to become smart themselves? Alternatively, does the environment people grow up in greatly change their potential? Will teachers' kids be especially likely to be great learners because of access to their parent's knowledge and methods? The nature versus nurture dilemma is one that scientists have been studying for decades. Read on to learn about how nature and nurture affect your IQ.

Nature v. nurture

Daniel Griffin wrote, "Nature vs. Nurture? Feral Children" which studies children who grew up in the wilderness and had no human interaction. These children had learned skills like how to survive from the animals around them, such as monkeys and dogs. They took on the behaviors and mannerisms of the creatures they lived alongside. However, when found and integrated with the rest of human society, the children were able to be educated. However, their chances of fully developing and becoming functional adults were not high because they had missed crucial learning opportunities as children. The feral children had to learn and reach normal milestones for babies and young kids (like learning their parents are still alive and will come back even when they are out of sight) but at a much later age. These limitations found in the feral children studies show that nurture is a huge part of a person's IQ. When children have opportunities to learn and grow from the moment they are born with the help of supportive parents they have a better chance of succeeding in school and life. 

Another study at Virginia Commonwealth University, the University of Virginia and Lund University in Sweden studied twins who lived in separate households. Published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, the research found that those who resided with more educated households have a higher cognitive ability than those in lower intelligence environments. This finding does not discount the fact that DNA also plays a key role in intellect, but notes that nurture, especially at a young age, is also important.

A person's genetics do have an effect on their smarts, however. Individuals who have highly intelligent parents often grow up in more affluent homes with better access to higher education opportunities, larger and more difficult vocabularies and financial stability. All of these factors can improve a person's potential for learning and lead to a higher IQ. 

Genetics Home Reference noted that like all genetic traits, intelligence is complex and affected by familial and environmental factors. There is no one gene that will tell scientists how smart a person can be. Instead, small parts of many genes link intelligence, which can make it difficult to know how DNA is a part of human IQs. GHR also shared that it is likely each person's individual IQ is a 50/50 mix of environment and genetics, or nature and nurture. While parents cannot change their kids' DNA, they can provide an environment that is stimulating and offers opportunities for learning and growth while a child is developing.

How can you increase your kids' IQs?

Since nurturing a child has a major effect on their IQ, parents can do some things to help their kids along. For example, Psych Central noted that enrolling young children in preschool can boost IQ, as well as engaging kids while reading together. Pregnant women can incorporate essential fatty acids like fish high in omega-3s into their diet while pregnant and breastfeeding to improve a child's IQ.

Reading aloud to your kids and using a wide range of words while speaking will help them gain language skills which will come in handy during their academic and professional careers. Encouraging kids to attend school, do their homework, study and ask questions when they need help can also work toward increasing their smarts. Knowing they have a supportive family can greatly help kids step out of their comfort zones and try new things which lead to learning experiences. Even doing puzzles with young kids can quicken the development of and reinforce their cognitive abilities.

Talk to your child's physician about his mental growth. There are specific milestones for each age that a baby, toddler, and even kid or teen should reach. Keep your children on track for these important steps by providing them with ample opportunities to learn and grow inside and outside your home.

... READ MORE
Great books for gifted kids
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2015 10:58 AM

If you're the parent of a gifted child, you've seen his or her kids IQ test results. These numbers have probably left you wondering how you can challenge your son or daughter while at home. Providing him or her with reading that is exciting and a little difficult may help improve vocabulary skills and comprehension. Here are a few books recommended by the Young Mensan Book Parade:

'One Bear Extraordinaire' by Jayme McGowan
McGowan is an incredible writer and illustrator who created this book. She paints, cuts and layers pieces before assembling them into the images in the finished "One Bear Extraordinaire," giving each page a 3D look that is sure to capture the imagination of your gifted child. This story is about a musical bear who journeys through the forest to find new songs and band members to play with. McGowan's rhythmic writing will have your gifted child singing her praises.

'Hope for Winter: The True Story of a Remarkable Dolphin Friendship' by Craig Hatkoff and David Yates
When Winter the dolphin was born without a tail, she had a tough life ahead of her. Just five years after a marine team rescued her from the ocean, the scientists came across another orphaned, injured dolphin and named it Hope. The duo became friends, and the tale is one of camaraderie and inspiration.

'Top Secret Files: Pirates and Buried Treasure' by Stephanie Bearce
Does your gifted child enjoy playing pirates, claiming new territories as he or she goes? This Top Secret Files book will get your little swashbuckler's adrenaline pumping! The book features historical accounts of the real pirates of the Caribbean and Blackbeard, as well as battles and exotic creatures. You just might kickstart a love of history when you read this book together!

'Mesmerized: How Ben Franklin Solved a Mystery that Baffled All of France' by Mara Rockliff
Many young children are interested in magic, from fairies and elves to disappearing acts. This exciting book offers an interesting look into the life of Benjamin Franklin as he developed ways to approach science that were less flashy than other showboaters of his time. Your child will learn about observation and making a hypothesis, as well as fancy magic shows that people considered "science" during the time Franklin first arrived in Paris, France. Rockliff's book is a fun look into history that your child will find fascinating.

... READ MORE
Pesticides associated with reduced cognitive development
MONDAY, AUGUST 10, 2015 17:51 PM

Pyrethroid insecticides are common in households all over the world. Families use them in gardens to rid their plants of unwanted pests and farmers use them on crops to keep away swarms of bugs. People realize that a high-dosage of these chemicals can have a negative impact on a person's health, but they rarely stop to think about what exposure to low-doses of these insecticides can do, especially to a young child's brain still in the developmental process.

A study published in the journal Environmental International set out to determine if low-level exposure to Pyrethroid insecticides affected a child's neurodevelopment. The researchers studied 287 mothers and their children  by collecting urine samples between 6 and 19 weeks into the pregnancy, and again when the children reached 6 years old. Two insecticide metabolites, known as 3-PBA and cis-DBCA, were associated with a negative impact on neurocognitive development, particularly for verbal comprehension and working memory scores. These ratings were measured using the  Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children.

Children are more vulnerable to pesticides, not only because they are in a delicate developmental period throughout childhood, but because they are lower to the ground, as well. When children play outside in an area that has been sprayed by pesticides, they are likely to consume small amounts of the substance, thus, negatively impacting future IQ scores.

Other harmful effects linked to pesticides
Along with developmental delays, prenatal exposure to agricultural pesticides is believed to induce autism. A study published in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives observed 970 participants to determine whether their residential proximity to agricultural pesticides during pregnancy was linked to autism spectrum disorders or developmental delays. The results found that mothers who were exposed to organophosphates at some point during gestation were associated with a 60 percent increased risk for autism spectrum disorders.

How to minimize exposure to pesticides
Many people are concerned about what their children are exposed to at a young age, and, if you fear for your child's development, there are steps you can take to reduce your pesticide interaction. First, living near agricultural fields nearly guarantees you and your family will come into contact with pesticides because farmers use crop dusting to protect their plants from various insects and other pests. The wind blows these chemicals onto your garden and yard, exposing you to the pesticides when you go outside. So, moving to an area with fewer agricultural fields can fix this problem.

In addition, Eartheasy suggests buying organic produce because these items are usually pesticide-free. Just to be sure, however, make sure you are washing your fruits and vegetables before consuming them. 

... READ MORE
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Personality Test Information


Anxiety symptoms could affect depressed adolescents
TUESDAY, AUGUST 13, 2013 11:18 AM

A total of 40 million adults in the U.S. have anxiety disorders, according to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America. With so many individuals affected by these conditions, it is essential for people to recognize the signs of anxiety disorders as early as possible.

One way to identify early symptoms among adolescents may be to have them take a personality test. If these individuals show signs of depression, they could be at risk of developing anxiety, based on the results of a recent study from Southern Methodist University.

Overall, there were three risk factors that increased adolescents' odds of developing anxiety. In addition to displaying symptoms of depression, these youths also had either a pessimistic outlook on life, low-quality family relationships or mothers with a history of anxiety. Ultimately, it is important to identify signs of anxiety among adolescents before it can harm their personal and academic development.

"Anxiety can manifest as social phobia, in which kids are afraid to interact with friends and teachers, or in school refusal, in which children try to avoid going to school," said Chrystyna D. Kouros, the psychologist who led the study. 

... READ MORE
Players of fast-paced video games may become more aggressive
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 07, 2013 11:59 AM

Earlier this year, a study was published in "Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice" that found that playing violent video games can lead to the development of aggressive and even criminal behavior. Now, new research from Iowa State University once again shows a link between playing video games and increased aggression.

That is not to say video games cannot have a positive effect on players. According to the research, violent and fast-paced video games known as first-person shooters, require individuals to think quickly if they are to advance. This enhances players' visual skills over time.

Unfortunately, players' also experience a reduction in their ability to restrain impulsive behavior. This, in turn, means that those who play these fast-paced games can become more aggressive. 

"We believe that any game that requires the same type of rapid responding as in most first-person shooters may produce similar effects on proactive executive control, regardless of violent content," said Craig Anderson, director of the Center for the Study of Violence at Iowa State University, who worked on the study.

Based on these findings, individuals who play fast-paced video games on a regular basis may want to take a personality test and see if it is time to unplug their gaming console.

... READ MORE
Personality tests could help colleges retain STEM majors
THURSDAY, JULY 25, 2013 10:20 AM

A 2011 report by the U.S. Department of Commerce shows that in the past decade, the growth of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) jobs was three times greater than that of non-STEM jobs. This growth is expected to continue in the coming decade as well, meaning there will be a great need for Americans with a college degree in one of these subjects.

However, many college students who study STEM subjects end up switching their major before graduating. To determine why this happens, researchers from Georgia Tech and Rice universities studied 589 undergraduates at the Georgia Institute of Technology between 2000 and 2008, paying close attention to their personality traits, self-concept and motivation, Psych Central reports.

In doing so, the researchers found that female STEM students tend to switch majors because they have "lower self-concepts in math and science," while men typically have "lower levels of orientation toward mastery and organization."

Based on these results, researchers feel that colleges could better predict students' long-term success in STEM subjects if they look at their Advanced Placement exam scores and personality test results during the admissions process.

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Career Test Information


Monday is the best day to apply for a job
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 06, 2013 18:51 PM

Unfortunately for job seekers, the best day of the week to apply for a position is typically not included among the results of an aptitude test. Fortunately, Bright.com, a website designed to match recruiters with those who are looking for work, recently determined that the answer to this question is Monday, according to ABC News.

The news source highlighted the findings of a Bright.com study, which showed that 30 percent of job seekers who submitted their application on a Monday continued on to the hiring process' next stage. Only 20 percent of those who applied on Tuesdays were able to accomplish the same, while 14 percent of individuals who applied on Saturdays advanced.

With the holiday season about to begin, some individuals may not think the day of the week matters all that much in their job search. After all, many people believe that companies are more concerned with taking time off during late November and December than looking for new hires.

"Don't assume everyone has closed up shop for the holidays," Bob Corlett, founder and president of Staffing Advisors, wrote in a guest column in the Baltimore Business Journal. "Lots of employers are actively interviewing right now, and most are hoping you can start work in December or early January."

... READ MORE
Report highlights disconnect between job seekers and hiring managers
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2013 15:01 PM

After taking an aptitude test, job seekers may have a good sense of what skills they possess. However, these individuals need to be careful not to become overconfident in terms of what they have to offer. Based on the findings contained in a recent Career Advisory Board report, companies may not be as confident in job candidates' abilities.

Differences of opinion
The new report, which was created using survey responses from 507 job seekers and 500 hiring managers, shows that members of these two groups are out of sync. For example, 56 percent of job seekers said they are confident they know what companies are looking for in potential employees, while 72 percent of them are confident in their ability to share their skills and experience with employers.

However, hiring managers are not as confident in job seekers' abilities, and only 15 percent of these company officials said job seekers have the skills they desire. This disconnect is problematic, as people's overconfidence could be standing between them and the positions they desire.

Growing pessimism
The disconnect between job seekers and hiring managers could also affect individuals' outlook on the nation's economy. Although the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics states that the unemployment rate currently sits at 7.2 percent - the lowest it has been since 2008 - many people seeking employment are becoming pessimistic.

According to the report, 37 percent of job seekers said they have no confidence in the job market's ability to improve next year. This figure is a 7 percent increase over last year's total.

"We're seeing an increasing number of job seekers who are losing hope, but the economy isn't fully to blame," said Alexandra Levit, business and workplace consultant and Career Advisory Board member, in a statement. "Opportunities do exist for job seekers who are able to effectively demonstrate to hiring managers that they have specific in-demand skills."

Economic confidence high among hiring managers
While many job seekers are pessimistic, hiring managers are more hopeful. The report reveals that 86 percent of these professionals are somewhat confident the job market will improve next year.

In fact, 67 percent of hiring managers are so confident in the economy that they do not feel as though they need to settle for job candidates who are not perfect for open positions.

... READ MORE
Students don't have to attend top colleges to get a job
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 24, 2013 07:35 AM

As graduation approaches, college students may take an aptitude test to gain a better sense of what type of career is right for them. However, individuals who do not attend one of the nation's top schools may think they face an uphill battle in an already very competitive job market.

If students believe employers will hold their college's reputation against them, they may be worrying for nothing. According to CBS MoneyWatch, officials at many companies understand that not everybody has the opportunity to attend a top institution. Not having a degree from a big-name college is OK.

"It's better to hire a graduate from a B-level college who had an exceptional academic record, as compared to hiring a graduate from an A-level college who had a mediocre or poor academic record," Ford Myers, author of "Get The Job You Want, Even When No One's Hiring," told the news source.

New college graduates may be in luck when it comes to their job search, as the National Association of Colleges and Employers recently announced that employers plan to hire 7.8 percent more new degree holders during the 2013-2014 academic year than they did last year.

... READ MORE
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Other Test Information


Playing video games could increase IQ scores
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2014 14:41 PM

Many parents believe that playing video games wastes time and does not benefit their children at all. However, recent studies show that certain games actually increase brain function and develop cognitive flexibility, strategy forming and even increase brain matter in young children. While playing video games might not adhere to traditional methods of increasing IQ scores, practicing critical thinking and problem-solving skills remains one of the most important components of greater intelligence. Here are some ways your child can benefit from playing video games:

Effect of specially designed games on children
Dr. Tracy Alloway of the University of Stirling conducted a study that included more than 600 children from different parts of the world ages 6 to 16. Alloway provided the game Junglememory, which involves 30 progressively challenging levels and targets the memory centers of the brain. Participants tried to remember numbers and patterns that flashed on a screen. Alloway's game then required the children to use the numbers in a separate task. 

The subjects of the study played the game four times a week for eight weeks. Each session lasted approximately 15 minutes.

According to Alloway, 9 out of 10 students who participated in the study showed substantial improvement in their ability to solve mathematical and verbal problems. Some students also scored almost 10 points higher on IQ tests.

Alloway believes that games like these develop the brain's ability to not only recall facts, but use newly acquired information in novel ways. In relation to IQ tests, this means students can increase their ability to retrieve vocabulary and math equations much easier.

Video games increase brain volume
Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development and Charite University Medicine took measurements of the study's participants' brain volume before and after playing Super Mario 64. The subjects played the game for at least half an hour every day for two months. The study showed a significant increase in gray matter compared to the control study group that did not play games.

According to the research, the areas of the brain that control spatial navigation, strategic planning and working memory experienced the largest increase in growth.

Strategic games improve cognitive agility
Scientists from the Queen Mary University of London and the University College of London conducted a study that focused on participants' cognitive flexibility. The researchers asked 72 volunteers to play the game StarCraft, a real-time military strategy game, and The Sims, which simulates real-life situations but doesn't require memory or tactics. Those who played StarCraft responded to questions that tested cognitive flexibility faster and more accurately than those who played The Sims. The results suggest that not all video games are created equal. Parents should do research and identify games that strengthen strategic planning and problem solving.  

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Prodigy Profile: Santiago Gonzalez
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 05, 2014 16:43 PM

While some teenage boys are just starting to think about relationships, parties and other types of high school drama, Santiago Gonzalez wonders about efficient computer programming and dreams of solving bugs in a set of code. The Littleton, Colo., native is a child computer prodigy and can write in more than a dozen programming languages. Santiago's aptitude test scores at an early age revealed an incredible mind. Barely a teen, Santiago has developed more than 15 iOS applications and hopes to achieve much in the future.

Early life
As a child, Santiago showed signs of a very high IQ. He understood adult conversations and was consumed with the desire to learn as much as he could. His parents noticed Santiago's love for geology, and by the time he was in first grade, he was reading college texts and adult-level books on rocks and minerals. When Santiago was first given an aptitude test, he scored in the 99.9 percentile.

Santiago's intelligence was a bit of a burden in elementary school. His teachers could not meet his needs and classroom lectures seemed endless and boring because he was not challenged at all. Other students had trouble accepting Santiago's above average intelligence and excluded him from social activities. By sixth grade, Santiago's parents saw that their son needed more than what elementary school could offer, so they brought him to the Colorado School of Mines, a reputable and nationally recognized engineering school. He was tested and accepted into their computer science program. Santiago is expected to graduate college by the age of 16 and complete his master's degree by 17.

Daily routine
Santiago's daily routine is simple, but far from easy. He wakes up at 5:30 a.m. and immediately writes code for one of his applications. After breakfast, he goes to school where he attends classes that he actually finds challenging and interesting, like Elements of Computing Systems and other general education courses. Santiago spends most of his time with faculty. He works as a research assistant for Professor William Hoff, whose focus is on energy efficiency in computer networks. Santiago helped Hoff develop sensor systems now used by the university.

Future of the programming prodigy
Early aptitude tests revealed to Santiago's parents that he needed more than what elementary, middle or high school academics could offer. Mr. and Mrs. Gonzalez knew that their child was gifted, and with the help of the aptitude tests, Santiago was given a chance to excel in school, love learning and work toward his dream of becoming an Apple software developer.

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For managers, there are several approaches to leadership
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 05, 2012 15:28 PM
Every boss has his own unique approach to managing employees. According to CareerBuilder, great bosses tend to be trustworthy and compassionate providers of constructive feedback. At the same time, AOL Jobs states that bad bosses are feared by their workers, controlled by stress and known to micromanage.

However, in some cases, the type of boss an individual becomes may have more to do with their characteristics than the decisions they choose to make at the office. For this reason, those who plan on assuming leadership roles may want to take a business management aptitude test to see what type of manager they might become.

If they pursue this option, they may find that they possess one of the leadership styles Government Executive recently highlighted, such as the democratic leader, who creates a flexible working environment and lets employees have a say in decisions.

On the other end of the spectrum is the coercive leader, who expects immediate compliance from his employees and, as a result, may create a less flexible work environment. If managers want to develop a personal bond with their employees and boost morale in the process, they may have an affiliative leadership style.
... READ MORE
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